株式会社Smart119|安心できる未来医療を創造する

Coronavirus reinfections: three questions scientists are asking (Nature 2020.09.04)

When news broke last week that a man living in Hong Kong had been infected with the coronavirus again, months after recovering from a previous bout of COVID-19, immunologist Akiko Iwasaki had an unusual reaction. "I was really kind of happy," she says. "It's a nice textbook example of how the immune response should work."

For Iwasaki, who has been studying immune responses to the SARS-CoV-2 virus at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, the case was encouraging because the second infection did not cause symptoms. This, she says, suggested that the man's immune system might have remembered its previous encounter with the virus and roared into action, fending off the repeat infection before it could do much damage.

But less than a week later, her mood shifted. Public-health workers in Nevada reported another reinfection -- this time with more severe symptoms. Was it possible that the immune system had not only failed to protect against the virus, but also made things worse? "The Nevada case did not make me happy," Iwasaki says.

Duelling anecdotes are common in the see-saw world of the COVID-19 pandemic, and Iwasaki knows that she cannot draw firm conclusions about long-term immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 from just a few cases. But in the coming weeks and months, Iwasaki and others expect to see more reports of reinfection, and, in time, a picture could emerge of whether the world can rely on the immune system to end the pandemic.

As data trickle in, Nature runs through the key questions that researchers are trying to answer about reinfection.

How common is reinfection?

Reports of possible reinfections have circulated for months, but the recent findings are the first to seemingly rule out the possibility that a second infection was merely a continuation of a first.

To establish that the two infections in each person were separate events, the Hong Kong and Nevada teams each sequenced1,2 the viral genomes from the first and second infections. Both found enough differences to convince them that separate variants of the virus were at work.

But, with only two examples, it is still unclear how frequently reinfections occur. And with 26 million known coronavirus infections worldwide so far, a few reinfections might not be cause to worry -- yet, says virologist Thomas Geisbert of the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston. We need a lot more information on how prevalent this is, he says.

That information might be on the horizon: timing and resources are converging to make it possible to identify more instances of reinfection. Enough time has passed since the initial waves of infection in many countries. Some regions are experiencing fresh outbreaks, providing an opportunity for people to be re-exposed to the virus. Testing has also become faster and more available. The Hong Kong man's second infection, for example, occurred after he had travelled to Spain and was screened for SARS-CoV-2 at the airport on his return to Hong Kong.

Also, scientists in public-health laboratories are beginning to find their feet again, says Mark Pandori, director of the Nevada State Public Health Laboratory in Reno, and an investigator on the Nevada study. During the first wave of the pandemic, it was hard to imagine tracking reinfections when testing labs were overwhelmed. Since then, Pandori says that his lab has had time to breathe -- and to set up sequencing facilities that can rapidly sequence large numbers of viral genomes from positive SARS-CoV-2 tests.

All of these factors will make it easier to find and verify reinfections in the near future, says clinical microbiologist Kelvin To at the University of Hong Kong.

Are reinfections more or less severe than the first?

Unlike Iwasaki, virologist Jonathan Stoye of the Francis Crick Institute in London took no comfort from the lack of symptoms from the Hong Kong man's second infection. Drawing conclusions from a single case is hard, he says. "I'm not certain that really means anything at all."

Stoye notes that the severity of COVID-19 varies enormously from person to person, and might vary from infection to infection in the same person. Variables such as the initial dose of virus, possible differences between variants of SARS-CoV-2 and changes in a person's overall health could all affect the severity of a reinfection. "There are almost as many unknowns about reinfection as there were before this case," he says.

Sorting out whether 'immunological memory' affects symptoms during a second infection is crucial, particularly for vaccine development. If symptoms are generally reduced the second time, as in the Hong Kong man, that suggests the immune system is responding as it should.

But if symptoms are consistently worse during a second bout of COVID-19, as they were in the person in Nevada, the immune system might be making things worse, says immunologist Gabrielle Belz at the University of Queensland and the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research in Victoria, Australia. For example, some cases of severe COVID-19 are worsened by rogue immune responses that damage healthy tissue. People who have experienced this during a first infection might have immune cells that are primed to respond in a disproportionate way again the second time, says Belz.

Another possibility is that antibodies produced in response to SARS-CoV-2 help, rather than fight, the virus during a second infection. This phenomenon, called antibody-dependent enhancement, is rare -- but researchers found worrying signs of it while trying to develop vaccines against related coronaviruses, responsible for severe acute respiratory syndrome and Middle East respiratory syndrome.

As researchers accumulate more examples of reinfection, they should be able to sort out these possibilities, says virologist Yong Poovorawan at Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok.

What implications do reinfections have for vaccine prospects?

Historically, the vaccines that have been easiest to make are against diseases in which primary infection leads to lasting immunity, says Richard Malley, a paediatric infectious-disease specialist at Boston Children's Hospital in Massachusetts. Examples include measles and rubella.

But the capacity for reinfection does not mean that a vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 can't be effective, he adds. Some vaccines, for example, require 'booster' shots to maintain protection. "It shouldn't scare people," Malley says. "It shouldn't imply that a vaccine is not going to be developed or that natural immunity to this virus can't occur, because we expect this with viruses."

Learning more about reinfection could help researchers to develop vaccines, says Poovorawan, by teaching them which immune responses are important for maintaining immunity. For example, researchers might find that people become vulnerable to reinfection after antibodies drop below a certain level. They could then design their vaccination strategies to account for that -- perhaps by using a booster shot to maintain that antibody level, Poovorawan says.

As public-health officials grapple with the dizzying logistics of vaccinating the world's population against SARS-CoV-2, a booster shot would hardly be welcome news, but it would not place long-term immunity against SARS-CoV-2 completely out of reach, says Malley.

Still, Malley is concerned about the possibility that vaccines will only reduce symptoms during a second infection, rather than prevent that infection altogether. This provides some benefit, but it could effectively turn vaccinated individuals into asymptomatic carriers of SARS-CoV-2, putting vulnerable populations at risk. The elderly, for example, are among the hardest hit by COVID-19, yet do not tend to respond well to vaccines.

For this reason, Malley is keen to see data on how much virus people 'shed' when reinfected with SARS-CoV-2. "They could still serve as an important reservoir of a future spread," he says. "We need to understand that better following natural infection and vaccination if we want to get out of this mess."

コロナウイルスの再感染:科学者が問う3つの疑問 (Nature 2020.09.04)


先週、香港在住の男性がコロナウイルスに再感染したというニュースが流れたとき、免疫学者の岩崎明子さんは少し変わった反応を示した。「私は何となく嬉しかった。免疫反応がどのように機能すべきかの教科書的な例です。」

コネチカット州ニューヘイブンにあるエール大学でSARS-CoV-2ウイルスに対する免疫反応を研究している岩崎氏にとって、2回目の感染で症状が出なかったことは心強いことであった。このことは、この男性の免疫システムが前回のウイルスとの遭遇を覚えていて、大きな被害が出る前に働き始めて再感染を防いだ可能性があることを示唆している、と彼女は言う。

しかし、1週間も経たないうちに、彼女の気分は変わった。ネバダ州の公衆衛生の職員たちは、初回感染よりも深刻な症状を伴う別の再感染の例を報告した。免疫システムがウイルスから身を守ることができなかっただけでなく、事態を悪化させた可能性があるのだろうか?「ネバダ州の例は、私を喜ばせてくれませんでした」と岩崎氏は言う。

COVID-19パンデミックの世界では、このような逸話の言い合いはよくあることであり、岩崎氏は、SARS-CoV-2に対する長期的な免疫反応について、わずか数例の症例からでは確固たる結論を出すことができないことを理解している。しかし、岩崎氏らは、今後数週間から数ヶ月の間に再感染の報告が増えることを期待している。そのうちに、世界が免疫システムを頼りにパンデミックを終わらせることができるかどうかについてのイメージが浮かび上がってくるだろう。

データが続々と入ってくる中、Nature誌は研究者が再感染について答えを出そうとしている重要な疑問について説明している。

再感染はどのくらい多いのか?

再感染の可能性があるとの報告は数ヶ月前から出回っていたが、最近の発見は、2回目の感染が1回目の感染の単なる続きである可能性を排除したと思われる最初の発見である。

香港とネバダ州のチームは、各人の2つの感染が別々の出来事であったことを証明するために、最初の感染と2回目の感染のウイルスゲノムの配列を決定した。どちらのチームも、別々のウイルスの変異体が働いていることを納得するのに十分な違いを発見した。

しかし、たった2つの例では、再感染がどのくらいの頻度で起こるのかはまだ明らかではない。ガルベストンにあるテキサス大学医学部のウイルス学者トーマス・ガイスバート氏は、これまでに世界中で2600万人のコロナウイルス感染が確認されているため、数回の再感染はまだ心配する必要はないと言う。これがどの程度流行しているのかについては、もっと多くの情報が必要だと彼は言う。

再感染の事例をより多く特定できるようにするための機会と資源が集まってきている。多くの国で感染の最初の波が起こってから十分な時間が経過している。一部の地域では新たな感染が発生しており、人々がウイルスに再感染する機会を与えている。検査も迅速化され、より広く利用できるようになってきている。例えば、香港の男性の2度目の感染は、スペインに渡航した後、香港に戻ってくる際に空港でSARS-CoV-2の検査を受けた後に発生した。

さらに、公衆衛生研究所の研究者たちは再び調子を戻してきたと、リノにあるネバダ州公衆衛生研究所の所長であり、このネバダ州の研究の研究者でもあるマーク・パンドリ氏は言う。パンデミックの最初の波の間、検査機関が圧倒されていたときに再感染を追跡することは想像に難かった。それ以来、彼の研究室には一息つく時間があり、SARS-CoV-2検査で陽性となったウイルスゲノムを迅速に大量に配列することができる配列決定設備を設置したとパンドリ氏は言う。

これらの要因のすべてが、近い将来、再感染の発見と検証を容易にするだろう、と香港大学の臨床微生物学者ケルビン・トーは言う。

再感染は1回目よりも重症度が高いのか低いのか?

岩崎氏とは異なり、ロンドンのフランシス・クリック研究所のウイルス学者ジョナサン・シュトイ氏は、香港の男性の2度目の感染で症状が出なかったことに安心感を覚えていない。単一の症例から結論を出すのは難しいと彼は言う。「それが本当に何の意味があるのか、私には確信が持てません。」

シュトイ氏は、COVID-19の重症度は人によって大きく異なり、同じ人でも感染ごとに異なる可能性があると指摘している。最初のウィルス量やSARS-CoV-2の変異体間の違い、健康状態の変化など、様々な要因が再感染の重症度に影響を与える可能性がある。「再感染については、今回の事例が起こる前と同じくらい多くの不明点があります」と同氏は言う。

"免疫学的記憶"が2回目の感染時の症状に影響を与えるかどうかを見極めることは、特にワクチン開発のために非常に重要である。香港の男性の場合のように、2回目の感染で症状が全般的に軽減された場合は、免疫システムが本来あるべき反応をしていることを示唆している。

しかし、ネバダ州の人のように、COVID-19の2回目の感染時に症状が一貫して悪化する場合は、免疫システムが状況を悪化させている可能性があると、クイーンズランド大学とオーストラリアのビクトリア州にあるウォルター&エリザホール医学研究所の免疫学者ガブリエル・ベルツ氏は言う。例えば、重度のCOVID-19のいくつかのケースは、健康な組織を損傷する不正な免疫応答によって悪化している。1回目の感染でこれを経験した人は、免疫細胞が2回目にも不釣合いな方法で反応するように準備している可能性がある、とベルツ氏は言う。

もう一つの可能性は、2回目の感染時にSARS-CoV-2に反応して産生された抗体が、ウイルスと戦うのではなく、ウイルスを助けるということである。抗体依存性増強と呼ばれるこの現象はまれであるが、研究者たちは、SARSやMERSの原因となる関連コロナウイルスに対するワクチンを開発しようとしている際に、この現象を示す厄介な兆候を発見した。

研究者が再感染に関する例をより多く蓄積するにつれて、彼らはこれらの可能性を整理することができるはずである、とバンコクのチュラロンコーン大学のウイルス学者ヨン・プーヴォラワン氏は言う。

再感染はワクチン開発の見通しにどのような影響を与えるのだろうか?

歴史的に、最も容易に製造されてきたワクチンは、一次感染が持続的な免疫をもたらす疾患に対するものであると、マサチューセッツ州ボストン小児病院の小児感染症専門医であるリチャード・マレー氏は言う。例としては、はしかや風疹などが挙げられる。

しかし、再感染の可能性があるからといって、SARS-CoV-2に対するワクチンが有効でないというわけではない、とマレー氏は付け加えた。ワクチンの中には、例えば、保護を維持するために「ブースター」注射を必要とするものがある。「人々を怖がらせるものではありません。ワクチンが開発されないとか、このウイルスに対する自然免疫が起こらないということを意味するものではありません。」

再感染について詳しく学ぶことは、免疫を維持するためにどの免疫反応が重要であるかを教えてくれ、研究者がワクチンを開発するのに役立つ可能性がある、とプーヴォラワン氏は言う。例えば、研究者は、抗体がある一定のレベル以下に低下すると再感染に対して脆弱になることを発見するかもしれない。そうすれば、それを考慮してワクチン接種戦略を設計することができるだろう、とプーヴォラワン氏は言う。

公衆衛生当局は、SARS-CoV-2に対するワクチンを世界の人口に接種させるという目まぐるしい課題に取り組んでいるため、ブースター注射は歓迎すべきニュースとは言えないが、SARS-CoV-2に対する長期的な免疫が完全に手の届かないものになるわけではない、とマレー氏は言う。

それでも、マレー氏は、ワクチンが二次感染までまとめて防ぐのではなく、二次感染時の症状を軽減するにすぎない可能性を懸念している。これはある程度の利益をもたらすが、ワクチンを接種した人をSARS-CoV-2の無症状キャリアにしてしまう可能性があり、脆弱な人々を危険にさらすことになりかねない。例えば、高齢者はCOVID-19の影響を最も強く受けるにもかかわらず、ワクチンへの反応が良くない傾向がある。

このような理由から、マレー氏は、SARS-CoV-2に再感染したときにどれだけのウイルスを「排出」したかというデータを見たいと考えている。「彼らはまだ将来の感染拡大の重要な貯蔵庫としての役割を果たしている可能性があります」と彼は言う。「この混乱から抜け出したいのであれば、自然感染とワクチン接種の後に、このことをよりよく理解する必要があります。」

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-020-02506-y?utmsource=twitter&utmmedium=social&utmcontent=organic&utmcampaign=NGMTUSGJC01GLNature

#ワクチン#基礎研究#病態
要約は、deepl.com によって機械翻訳されたものを当社スタッフが修正・編集したものです。 要約、コメント、図画はできる限り正確なものにしようと努めていますが、内容の正確性・完全性・信頼性・最新性を保証するものではありません。
内容の引用を行う場合は、引用元が「Smart119 COVID-19 Archive 」であると明記ください。
Share
お問い合わせはこちら